NO Cardio Before Strength Training, and you KNOW my Position is NEVER Cardio (But This is for Those Who Still Wish To Perform It)

Acute Resistance Exercise Performance is Negatively Impacted by Prior Aerobic Endurance Exercise.

Ratamess, Nicholas A.; Kang, Jie; Porfido, Tara M.; Ismaili, Craig; Selamie, Soraya; Williams, Briana; Kuper, Jeremy D.; Bush, Jill A.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine acute resistance exercise (RE) performance following four different aerobic endurance (AE) protocols. Eleven healthy, resistance-trained men (21.0 +/- 1.2 yrs) performed a control RE protocol and four RE protocols 10 min following different AE protocols in random sequence. The RE protocol consisted of 5 exercises (high pull, squat, bench press, deadlift, and push press) performed for 3 sets of 6-10 repetitions with 70-80% of one repetition-maximum (1RM) with 3-min rest intervals in between sets. The AE protocols consisted of treadmill running at velocities corresponding to: 1) 60% of their VO2 reserve (VO2R) for 45 min (P1); 2) 75% of their VO2R for 20 min (P2); 3) 90-100% of VO2R in 3-min intervals (1:1 ratio) for 5 sets (P3); and 4) 75% of VO2R (4.5 mph) uphill (6-9% grade) for 20 min (P4). Completed repetitions, average power and velocity, heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed each set. Protocols P1 to P4 resulted in 9.1 to 18.6% fewer total repetitions performed compared to the control RE protocol with the squat experiencing the greatest reduction. Average power and velocity were significantly reduced for the high pull, squat, and bench press following most AE protocols. RPE values for the high pull and squat were significantly higher in P1 to P4 compared to control. HR was significantly higher during RE following P1-P4 compared to control by 4.3 to 5.5%. These results indicate acute RE performance is significantly compromised in healthy men following AE exercise of different type, intensity, and duration with largest reductions observed following high-intensity interval exercise.

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